FromThisSeat Blog

 

Welcome to the FromThisSeat Blog.

Here our editors will bring you plenty of news coverage on tickets, ballparks, stadiums and arenas as they pertain to the NFL, NHL, MLB and NBA.  If you have any questions or suggestions pertaining to the articles, feel free to 'Contact Us' via the navigation bar.

Paul Brown Stadium Seating Chart 

Paul Brown Stadium’s seating chart is very easy to understand and navigate as a fan. The stadium is one of the most symmetrical stadiums in the National Football League and has only three levels of seats; the lower level (100’s), the club level and upper end zone (200’s) and the upper level (300’s). Paul Brown Stadium has been home to the Cincinnati Bengals since 2000 and is a beautiful open-aired stadium on the banks of the Ohio River.

Stubhub Center Seating Chart, Home of the Los Angeles Chargers 

The Stubhub Center will serve as the temporary home stadium of the Los Angeles Chargers until the 2020 NFL season when they move into their $2.6 billion stadium in Inglewood. During that time, the venue will be known as the smallest stadium in the National Football League with a capacity of only 27,000 seats. With such a small capacity, the Stubhub Center will offer one of the most intimate viewing experiences in the NFL. The Los Angeles Chargers have spent $10 million to bring the stadium up to NFL standards. The Stubhub Center is located in Carson, California, was previously known as the Home Depot Center and is also home to Major League Soccer’s Los Angeles Galaxy.

Fedex Forum Interior, Home of the Memphis Grizzlies

FedexForum, home of the Memphis Grizzlies, are currently adding a new high definition scoreboard as well as four large video displays in the corners of the arena. These upgrades are expected to be complete in time for the beginning of the 2017-2018 NBA season. At the moment, FedexForum is the only NBA arena that doesn’t offer high definition video technology for their fans.

Capital One Arena, Home of the Washington Capitals and Washington Wizards

The Verizon Center, home of the Washington Wizards and Washington Capitals, is changing it’s name to Capital One Arena effective immediately. The venue, located in D.C.’s Chinatown, first opened as the MCI Center in 1997 and changed names after MCI was acquired by Verizon in 2006. The official dollar amount of the naming rights agreement is unknown to the public. Bloomberg News claims that the new naming rights deal is for 10 years and exceeds $100 million.

Exterior View of Shake Shack

Shake Shack is a New York City fast food restaurant that specializes in “roadside burgers”, milkshakes and crinkle-cut fries. As it turns out, one Shake Shack wasn’t enough for the city of Baltimore. The Baltimore Ravens are now bringing Shake Shack to M&T Bank Stadium, much to the enjoyment of their fans. The Ravens debuted Shake Shack on Thursday when they hosted their first preseason game vs. the Washington Redskins.

South End Zone at Heinz Field, Home of the Pittsburgh Steelers

After adding a few thousand seats to south end zone at Heinz Field a few seasons ago, the Pittsburgh Steelers are now adding a new scoreboard to the area. The scoreboard is 45% larger than the previous scoreboard, will measure 5,000 total square feet and will be 41 feet high and 123 ½ feet wide. Technology giant Daktronics helped the Pittsburgh Steelers organization install and operate the scoreboard which will feature a 13HD pixel layout.

Hello Kitty Night at Miller Park, Home of the Milwaukee Brewers

We’ve heard of some strange ticket promotions in our day. The Los Angeles Dodgers, however, may take the cake when they host “Hello Kitty Night” at Dodger Stadium on September 25th. Oddly enough, the Los Angeles Dodgers have hosted “Hello Kitty Nights” during previous seasons. Maybe the event is a hit? Even the Milwaukee Brewers hosted a Hello Kitty Night at Miller Park earlier this season. We're just having a hard time connecting Hello Kitty, which appeals to young girls, to the game of baseball. 

Wrigley Field, Home of the Chicago Cubs

The Cincinnati Reds were the first Major League Baseball team to play night baseball when they hosted the Philadelphia Phillies at Crosley Field on May 24th, 1935. The Chicago Cubs, however, did not play their first night game at Wrigley Field until August 8th, 1988 (8/8/88) when they too hosted the Philadelphia Phillies. That was 29 years ago, today. Day baseball has long been a distinguishable tradition at Wrigley Field. Oddly enough, the Chicago Cubs recently lobbied for more night games to be held at Wrigley Field moving forward and the city is pushing back.

Playing Field at Bank of America Stadium, Home of the Carolina Panthers

The Carolina Panthers unveiled a $47 million upgrade to Bank of America Stadium this weekend during Fan Fest. Local taxpayers contributed $17 million towards the project. The renovation was the fourth phase of a five-year renovation plan that totals $170 million in costs and has taken place each off-season. The various phases of renovations were aimed at helping the Carolina Panthers organization generate new revenue streams and improve the fan experience at the stadium.

Chase Field Exterior, Home of the Arizona Diamondbacks

The Arizona Diamondbacks and Maricopa County, Arizona are currently in a heated discussion about which party is responsible for repairs to Chase Field’s air conditioning system and damaged sanitation piping system. Major League Baseball has given it’s stance on the dispute and alleges that they could be forced to move the Arizona Diamondbacks to another city if the repairs aren’t soon addressed. The Diamondbacks organization originally sued Maricopa County back in January so that the team could break their current lease at Chase Field and pursue funding for a new ballpark.

Talking Stick Resort Arena, Home of the Phoenix Suns

After the Arizona Coyotes and Gila River Arena renegotiated their current lease agreement, the Coyotes had since been pursuing a new home arena in Tempe, Arizona in partnership with Arizona State University. However, those plans have since fallen through after Arizona State University backed out of the plan. The Coyotes also suffered a major setback when Arizona state bill 1149 was not voted on. The bill would have provided the funding to build a new arena for the Coyotes in the Phoenix area. NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman has reiterated time and time again that the Coyotes will not be able to stay in Glendale, Arizona for the long term.

Steve Bartman World Series Championship Ring

It’s been 14 years since Steve Bartman ruined the Chicago Cubs World Series run during game 6 of the 2003 NLCS vs. the Florida Marlins. We're only kidding. Bartman, a 26 year-old Cubs fan at the time, accidentally interfered with a foul ball that outfielder Moises Alou wouldn’t have been able to catch in the first place. That didn’t stop ESPN from milking the story for all it’s worth with the documentary “Catching Hell”. Unfairly, Bartman was scapegoated as being the reason the Chicago Cubs failed to reach their first World Series since 1945.

Downtown Houston, Texas 

Now that Houston Rockets owner Leslie Alexander has officially put the team up for sale, there are whispers that Houston, Texas could eventually lure an NHL franchise. Houston, one of the largest sports and television markets in the United States, already has the Toyota Center, a world-class arena that would provide a perfect home for an NHL team. Unfortunately, Leslie Alexander also controls the lease with the Toyota Center and has made it clear that he doesn’t want to share the venue with another sports franchise.

 

After filing for bankruptcy in 2016, sporting goods retailer Sports Authority struggled to live up to it’s naming rights agreement with the Denver Broncos and Mile High Stadium. The partnership was plagued with delinquent payments so the Denver Broncos organization terminated the agreement. Joe Ellis, team President, was hopeful that the team would be able to secure a new naming rights agreement with a new corporate sponsor by the start of the 2017 NFL season. However, the right partner has yet to present itself.

Private Suite at Soldier Field, Home of the Chicago Bears

On August 24th, the Chicago Bears and Chicago Tribune will be teaming up to host a fantasy football draft party at Soldier Field. At the conclusion of the event, all attendees will be able to have their picture taken on the field. The draft party will feature two packages; a standard package and a VIP package and is sponsored by Jewel-Osco.

Wrigley Field, Home of the Chicago Cubs

Day games have long been a tradition of both the Chicago Cubs and Wrigley Field. In fact, the Chicago Cubs had never hosted a night game at Wrigley Field until August 8th, 1988 (8/8/88). To put that into better perspective, Wrigley Field opened in 1914. Crane Kenney, President of Business Operations for the Chicago Cubs, is now lobbying for more night games to be hosted at Wrigley Field. However, the city of Chicago limits the number of home games the Chicago Cubs can host.

The Montreal Canadiens are hitting season ticket holders with a $150 penalty if they elect to have their season tickets printed and mailed to them. According to Francois Marchand, a spokesman for the team, mobile tickets will be a priority next season for reasons pertaining to security, ease of use and the environment. Therefore, all season ticket holders will be receiving their season tickets via their mobile devices unless they elect to pay the $150 surcharge.

Seats at Ford Field, Home of the Detroit Lions 

Photo Source: WXYZ.com

Detroit’s Ford Field is one of the most underrated stadiums in the National Football League. Earlier this year, the Detroit Lions announced that they would be upgrading Ford Field at a cost of $100 million. Those renovations are expected to be completed in one week. The centerpiece of the renovation are the brand new video boards in each endzone.

Suntrust Park, Home of the Atlanta Braves

The Washington Examiner wrote an article yesterday that called for the end of the usage of public dollars to build stadiums and arenas for sports teams. The popular newspaper cited the Brookings Institution which determined that 36 stadiums have been constructed since 2000 that have cost federal taxpayers $3.2 Billion. The article was inspired by a recent bipartisan bill that aims to keep taxpayer dollars from being used to build new stadiums for professional sports franchises and their billionaire owners. The bill is being championed by Senators Cory Booker (D) of New Jersey and James Lankford (R) of Oklahoma.

Toyota Center, Home of the Houston Rockets 

To the surprise of many within the Houston Rockets organization, owner Leslie Alexander listed the team for sale earlier this week. The NBA is expecting the highest bidder to spend well over $1 billion to acquire the Houston Rockets in what could be the largest transaction in NBA history. But how could a team not named the Los Angeles Lakers or New York Knicks command so much money?

Oracle Arena, Home of the Golden State Warriors

Beginning in 2019, the Golden State Warriors will be the first team in NBA history to require their fans to purchase a personal seat license (PSL) in order to buy season tickets. The new rule will begin when the Warriors move to downtown San Francisco and begin playing at the newly constructed Chase Center. What exactly is a personal seat license?